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State Bar of California Proposal for MCLE Providers to Report Attendance

Posted By June Hahm, Crowell & Moring LLP, Friday, February 3, 2017

The State Bar of California proposed a requirement for California MCLE providers to report attendance of all its CLE offerings to the Bar. The proposal which was presented during the August MCLE Provider Meetings was developed in response to issues that the Bar discovered during past MCLE audits. Issues included failure to properly record actual time of online course completion, and miscalculation of hours.

 

The Bar’s initial concept was to build a database that providers would access to input all relevant CLE course and attendance information for each course. Many providers, especially nonprofit providers, were concerned when told that the costs of setting up this type of reporting system would be passed on to providers through attendance reporting fees.

 

 

 

Below are links to the video recordings of the MCLE Provider Meetings.

MCLE Provider Meeting (August 23, 2016)

MCLE Provider Meeting (August 30, 2016)

Tags:  CLE  MCLE  State Bar California 

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Join ACLEA to network in the friendliest city of 2016!

Posted By Kristin Huotari, State Bar of Wisconsin, Wednesday, January 11, 2017
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Every year Travel + Leisure conducts a survey asking people to rate their perceptions as visitors to 38 metro areas.  The survey asks respondents to offer their opinions on the local style, cultural attractions, dining experiences, and overall friendliness.  The scores are then ranked and a winner is selected.

And the friendliest city in 2016 is….NASHVILLE!!! 

Visitors said they loved the music, food, and welcoming atmosphere of this fine city.  And our lucky ACLEA members will be able to experience all of this for themselves, along with locals who are eager to share their home with us.  The 53rd mid-year meeting will be held at the Loew’s Vanderbilt Hotel, January 28-31, 2017.

Networking galore!

The best thing about coming to an ACLEA conference is catching up with old friends and making new ones.  And Nashville will be just the place for you to accomplish all of that, along with bringing innovative and proven initiatives back to your shop.  We’ll be bringing you sessions with a deep dive into data, marketing, hiring, and entrepreneurship. 

And with the networking opportunities, you are bound to have a good time.  Receptions, fitness, karaoke, and the closing Honky Tonk Dinner where ACLEA will take over the Tin Roof on Broadway for dinner, dancing, and live music! The Tin Roof on Broadway opened in 2014 in the former Hatch Show Print Building nestled among Nashville’s legendary Honky Tonks. Over the years, their stages have hosted the famous, the should-have-been famous, and everyone in between.

So don’t miss a chance to enjoy good food, good music, and good times at ACLEA’s Mid-Year Meeting!

>> Tell Me More

>> Sign Me Up!

 

Tags:  ACLEA  mid-year meeting  nashville  networking 

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Book Review: Captivate: Presentations that Engage and Inspire

Posted By Earl Dumitru, President, Association of Law Officers of the Crown, Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Anyone can do this.

~ Steve Hughes

As a firm introvert who (too occasionally…) has the privilege of speaking with an audience of up to 500 people, I am always on the lookout for good practical advice on presentations. ACLEA has definitely earned its registration fee this year by introducing me to the work of Steve Hughes.

Many of you will have witnessed a Steve Hughes presentation in person – as part of his “Hit Your Stride” programming, as a speaker at your CLE events, or at ACLEA (including the recent Seattle meeting). Now there is a helpful and easy-to-read book length companion ­— Captivate: Presentations that Engage and Inspire.

Captivate has 4 main parts: Crafting Your Talk, Making it Engaging, Delivering Your Speech, and Polishing Your Skills. Each is divided into 5-7 distinct (but well cross-referenced) chapters on discrete topics. You can read the whole book to see the process/flow of crafting and delivering a talk, or you can access specific topics as needed.

One fun — and helpful — feature is that the book is written as a presentation and applies many of the recommended strategies. For example, storytelling is a powerful tool used in presentations. Chapters 7 and 12 recommend leading with a story (or another attention grabber) and coming back to more administrative matters and introductions. And, you guessed it, Chapter 1 is a story about the big Memphis speech while Chapter 2 is “How to Use this Book’”

Some of my key practical takeaways include:

  • SPARQ – Grabbing Their Attention from Word One (Ch. 7) – puts the current focus on storytelling in a broader context and gives you additional tools for opening.
  • Content trumps delivery; the best delivery is authentic.
  • Use eye contact with the audience, enough time to deliver a single thought (probably a sentence or two).
  • Do not end your presentation with a Q&A. It can be near the end, but not the very end — you want to control the final message to the audience.

As an added bonus, ACLEA has previously commissioned 4 Steve Hughes “Train the Trainer Videos” which are available on the website: www.aclea.org/?page=train_the_trainer. I found the “Using PowerPoint Effectively” video especially compelling as it addressed how to better present the type of detailed technical information that is often at the core of CLE sessions.

So, my call to action: read the book, watch the videos, and feel more confident about your next presentation!

Tags:  book review  captivate  presentation  Steve Hughes 

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Is the Future of Marketing Already Here?

Posted By Carmen Hill, Director of Marketing, Connective DX, Thursday, November 17, 2016

ACLEA’s 52nd annual conference in Seattle featured a series of TED-style talks focused on the future and what different aspects of the legal profession and continuing legal education might be like in 2025. This post is based on one of those talks, The Future of Marketing, presented by Carmen Hill.

Is the Future of Marketing Already Here?

By Carmen Hill

 

It’s hard to believe, but by the time 2025 rolls around, it will have been 50 years since the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the right of lawyers to advertise their services in the case of Bates vs. State Bar of Arizona. During that time we’ve seen changes that would have seemed like science fiction: the internet, smartphones, social media, marketing automation… the list goes on and on.

 

Meanwhile, legal marketing evolved (devolved?) into the over-the-top genre of late-night TV and billboard ads that inspired the hit Netflix series Better Call Saul. And it’s safe to say change is only going to accelerate between now and 2025.

Meet the Class of 2025

In 2025, there will be almost 10 more years of new, young lawyers in the field, and many older lawyers will have retired by then. Generation Z is the cohort of six to 18-year-olds that makes up 25% of the U.S. population. In just a few years they’ll account for 40% of all consumers.

 

It almost goes without saying that this will be a generation of digital natives. Lawyers who graduate in 2025 have never experienced life without the internet or Google. They’ve been able to tap an iPhone screen since they were in second grade, and swipe right for “yes” or left for “no” since they were old enough to go on their first date.

 

Meanwhile, millennials, or Generation Y,  are already the largest generation in the U.S. workforce. By 2025 they’ll make up nearly half of it. You may already be sick of hearing about millennials, but ignore them at your peril. More than 70% of millennials are involved in researching or making decisions about what products and services their companies buy (The Next Generation of B2B). And they are far more likely to use digital channels like search engines and social media to make those decisions.

The Future Is Already Here

It’s not just the future of marketing that will be digital; it’s the present. Today, you’re not only competing with other law firms for attention you’re competing with everything else on the internet. The days when you could buy an ad and expect millions of people to see it are long gone. Because at the same time marketers look to technology for new ways to reach consumers, those same consumers are finding new ways to filter them out.

 

First we had the mute button. Then we had TiVo and DVRs. Now, a lot of people—especially younger people—are getting rid of their TV altogether and watching online. Oh, and if you want to reach people online? That’s getting harder too.

 
  • There’s a less than one percent chance that someone will click on your banner ad (Think with Google).

  • And 41% of millennials will never see your ad to start with, because they’re using ad blocking software (Page Fair).

The Generation Gap

Jill Switzer, who writes for Above the Law, says both oldster and youngster lawyers are battling for the same slice of the shrinking pie. One of the “youngsters” is Bryan Wilson, from Fort Worth, Texas: The Texas Law Hawk. He graduated from Texas Tech law school a few years ago, and was voted “Most likely to do a TV commercial.” But he put a millennial twist on that notion: rather than pay big bucks for TV advertising, he made funny videos with his friends and posted them on YouTube.


This Fourth of July-themed ad is one of several that Bryan Wilson has produced. This one alone has had nearly 200,000 views on YouTube.

 

Wilson spent just $500 on his first ad and not a whole lot more than that on the others. But his phone is ringing off the hook. In this recent interview with D Magazine he said his biggest problem right now is that he has too many clients.

 

Others are disrupting not only legal marketing, but also legal services. Joshua Browder, a 19-year-old Stanford University student, launched a chat bot app called DoNotPay (Business Insider). It helps people who can’t afford a lawyer to fight simple legal battles like parking tickets for free. His “robot lawyer” has already beat more than 150-thousand tickets. Joshua Browder isn’t paying for advertising… he’s getting it all for free in the form of media coverage.

So, what’s next?

The Guardian writes that over the next 10 years most marketing will become like Amazon Recommends on steroids. If it creeps you out to have a pair of shoes you saw on Zappos follow you around the internet, just wait till your refrigerator tells you it’s time to stock up on ketchup—or even places the order for you on Amazon. Technology, combined with both big data and small data, will make it possible for marketers to be even more targeted, personalized and automated than we already are.

 

What if lawyer ads appeared on your car dashboard when you have an accident or get pulled over? This is not all that far-fetched. Several years ago Mercedes unveiled its concept of an augmented reality dashboard at the Consumer Electronics Show. And some predict that within only a few years, 90% of cars will be connected to the internet (CNN).

 

Wi-Fi-enabled cars could offer some intriguing opportunities for audience targeting: For example, parents and kids on the way to school or people commuting to work. What if you’re not even driving your car? How does a driverless car talk its way out of a ticket? This is what’s coming, sooner than you think.

Digital Trends You Should Not Ignore

It’s impossible to say for sure what marketing will look like in 2025, but many of the same trends are affecting every business. As we’re already seeing, communication will become increasingly fragmented, broken into smaller bits on mobile devices and social media. Generation Z will be filtering what they choose to see and hear with split-second speed and precision. And it will all be happening all the time.

 

While you’re waiting to see what comes next, there are a few future-friendly things that simply cannot wait.

  1. Make sure your website loads fast. You’ve only got a couple of seconds to show someone why they should stick around.

  2. Make sure your website is mobile-friendly with a responsive design that is easy for visitors to use on any device. If you don’t, site visitors will punish you by leaving, and Google will punish you with a bad search ranking.

  3. Invest in high-quality, valuable content that meets the needs of your prospective clients. Because if you don’t, your competitors else will.

Technology Is Just an Enabler

Regardless of where technology goes, the future of marketing still comes down to people. Nearly 40% of people still choose a lawyer the way they did a century ago: through someone they know (Moses & Rooth). No billboard, TV ad or even viral YouTube video holds a candle to the recommendations of trusted friends, family and colleagues. In short, understand the clients you’re trying to reach. Be helpful. Be interesting. And focus on providing the kind of experiences that clients love, even before they become a client.

 

Tags:  CLE  Marketing  Seattle  Technology 

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Compulsory Technology Programming as part of MCLE

Posted By Heather Elwell, Monday, October 24, 2016

Hello ACLEA!

 

Our CLE colleagues in Florida look to be the first jurisdiction required to navigate compulsory tech programming as part of mandatory CLE.  As described in the article below, Florida attorneys must complete 33 hours of CLE over a three-year period, of which three (3) hours must be an approved technology program. 

 

As an ACLEA member for the past 5 years,  I have been impressed by the significant effort that ACLEA has made to emphasize the importance of technology in our programs and publications for attorneys, as well as in running our own organizations effectively.  The Seattle conference, for example, included a plenary on The Future of Productivity, a deep drive on Reimagining Learning with Microsoft OneNote and Sway, and the famous tech tips and tricks session which focused on the iPad for CLE Professionals.  The upcoming Nashville conference will also walk the technology line with session on Redefining Technology Competence in a 21st Century Law Practice, Website and Search Engine Optimization, and PDF, Word, and Automation – How to Build an Effective Electronic Forms Strategy.

 

With regulators now joining the movement to incorporate technology into CLE,  we can expect technology and innovation to continue to be in the forefront of ACLEA programing.  Please share your experiences below.

 

https://bol.bna.com/florida-is-first-state-to-require-technology-cles/

Tags:  CLE  Florida  Nashville  Seattle  Technology 

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Can it be? Fun CLE?

Posted By Anna Wrisky, Friday, September 16, 2016
Updated: Monday, October 24, 2016
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What can CLE providers do to make their seminars more entertaining and enjoyable for their attendees?

Check out this article, listing a few ideas for how to make seminars fun, posted in the ABA Journal.

http://www.abajournal.com/magazine/article/cle_much_shelist_best_krieger

Tags:  attendees  CLE  fun  seminar 

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Review of The Checklist Manifesto

Posted By Alexandra Wong, The Law Society of Upper Canada, Friday, July 15, 2016
Updated: Friday, July 15, 2016
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A few weeks ago, I received an email with a suggested reading list ahead of the annual conference in Seattle and one book on the list caught my attention – The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande.

The Checklist Manifesto

It caught my eye for a number of reasons. I work with checklists on a daily basis whether I’m planning, developing or delivering CLE programs.

In my pre-CLE life, I worked in licensing exam management. There is no doubt in my mind that without checklists, the licensing exam management process would not run flawlessly with no errors. Having been through licensing processes in the financial services and legal service industries, I know that there is no room for errors at any stage in the process. Version management and seat assignment are integral to maintain the integrity of the process. From room set-up to break scheduling to catering requirements, a checklist is required.

In CLE, the same principles apply. In planning and developing a program, there are numerous steps involved that cannot be missed in order to ensure a successful program. There are also a number of people who are involved in the process, in addition to the faculty, so success would not be possible without a checklist. On the delivery side, from room set-up, to catering, to communications with attendees (prior to/during a program), all aspects depend upon and require a checklist.

Although Gawande’s research is mainly in the healthcare field, he looks at other industries, including aviation and construction, in relation to checklists. It is clear from his research that checklists make a difference and they work, regardless of the industry.

Checklists reduce the probability for human error. Checklists act as a guide to all steps that need to be completed. In aviation, not only do pilots have a checklist of procedures that need to be followed before a flight departs, but they also have a checklist of procedures to follow in the event of an emergency while in-flight. In medicine, particularly in performing surgeries, there is a team working on one patient; however, there are a number of procedures for each of those team members to follow. In construction, each step in building a structure is critical to the subsequent step and there is a fairly large team involved in the process.

Gawande shares an interesting example of the importance of a checklist. Well-known rock band Van Halen has an extensive list of requirements that covers key items such as the set-up of staging, sound equipment, lighting and security needs and nutritional requests for the band and crew when they are on tour. In the band’s contract with concert promoters, there was a specific clause: “no brown M&M’s”. They did this to ensure that the promoter read every single word in the contract. If the brown M&M’s appeared, the band did a complete audit of the full stage and sound setup to ensure everything was perfect. The idea was that if the tour venue was not careful in the “little things” — like ensuring there were “no brown M&M’s” — they couldn’t be trusted to be careful in key safety issues like proper heavy equipment installation. The devil is in the details. This is an example of a minor detail in a list of many, but it goes to show how important it is to follow a checklist, in this case a list of requirements.

Once developed, checklists can always be refined. I find myself doing that regularly after every CLE event. Slight tweaks and improvements make for continued success in events. This was especially the case when I worked in delivery of licensing examinations. When I started, a checklist did not exist. I was overwhelmed with the specific details that needed to be looked after, and my solution was to create a checklist. In my mind, I walked through the process from start to finish. As I did that, I put each step down on paper and translated it to a checklist for pre-exam day, exam day and post-exam. After each exam cycle and before the beginning of the next, I would review the checklist and make the necessary changes.

Gawande provides the reader with “A Checklist for Checklists,” that is, a guide to preparing checklists that work. He suggests three stages in the development of a checklist: development, drafting and validation. In the development stage, Gawande suggests adding items to the checklist that would improve communication among team members, something I would have never thought of, but a definite “best practice” tip. Another question he asks is, “were all members of the team involved in the checklist creation process?” There is no doubt that when several people are involved in a project, the checklist will affect them and their processes, so they should be consulted.

Gawande recommends that checklists be short, fit on one page, and have a title that reflects the objectives. He suggests that the checklist be tested with the people involved — in either a real or simulated situation — to make necessary adjustments to ensure the checklist works. He also suggests that once the checklist is put into action, it gets reviewed every so often to ensure it’s kept up to date and relevant.

The author reports that research has found that, without a checklist, the chance for error was higher. With a proper checklist in place, the chance for error decreased.

In CLE, whether we plan or deliver programs, checklists work. With a checklist in place, there is less chance for mistakes and missed deadlines. As good as I have been with creating and using checklists, I am looking forward to additional best practices from Larry Center, Georgetown Law Centre CLE, Donita Douglas, InReach and Paul Unger, Affinity Consulting Group in the “Be a Checklist Ninja!” workshop at the Annual Conference in Seattle.

Tags:  Atul Gawande  checklist  checklist manifesto 

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Connecticut Judges Approve MCLE to State’s Lawyers

Posted By Alexandra Wong, The Law Society of Upper Canada, Monday, June 27, 2016

As of January 1, lawyers licensed in Connecticut will have to complete 12 hours of CLE annually. For more information, see the article that was posted in the Connecticut Law Tribune.

 

Tags:  CLE  Connecticut  MCLE 

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Things to do in Seattle

Posted By Heather Elwell, Association of Law Officers of the Crown, Wednesday, June 8, 2016

The summer 2016 ACLEA Conference is just around the corner, and this time it’s in SEATTLE! 

Hopefully everyone is excited for another fabulous conference in this amazing city.    

If you’re looking for some things to do (on top of the wonderful happenings planned for the conference of course) here are some of the city’s top tourist attractions (vouched by locals).

Pike Place Market

Distance from hotel: 0.4 miles

There is nothing like a market to get a truly local experience of a city. This market located on the English Bay waterfront was built in 1903. The vendors range from local farmers, to cheese artisans, chocolatiers and craftspeople. They also have a bunch of cute little restaurants and buskers keeping the spirit alive.

The first ever Starbucks location was opened in this market. Apparently the line is always super long, but worth it to just get a chance to check out where it all began… where your favourite drinks were born! 

Check out the Pike Place Market Map & Visitors Guide

Fun fact about the Pike Place Market: Pike Place Market is the longest continuously operating farmer’s market in America.

Space Needle

Distance from hotel: 0.8 mile

Experience the view from Seattle's world famous Space Needle. There is an observation tower and a revolving restaurant perched 150 m up. The elevator travels at 4.5 m/s, getting you all the way up in 41 seconds. Hope you’re not scared of heights!

Fun fact about the Space Needle: When the Space Needle was first built in 1962 for the Seattle World’s Fair, it was the tallest building west of the Mississippi River.

Alki (Beach) Point

Distance from hotel: 8.7 miles

Alki point has a two and a half mile long pedestrian walkway, a long strip of beach and an amazing view of the Seattle skyline.

Fun fact about Alki (Beach) Point: The Denny Party (pioneers who left Illinois in a westward-bound wagon party) is credited with founding Seattle when they settled at Alki Point on November 13, 1851.

Capitol Hill

Distance from hotel: 1.4 miles

This is the city's most prominent nightlife and entertainment district. There is so much to do in this little character-filled neighborhood – full of restaurants, cafes, shopping and entertainment.

Fun fact about Capitol Hill: Look out for the huge statue of Jimmy Hendrix rocking out on the sidewalk!

Gum Wall

Distance from hotel: 0.5

Make your mark on Seattle! The 15x50 foot wall covered in gum is a local landmark. It was apparently scrubbed down in 2015, after a 20-year gum collection, but the new collection has been evolving quite rapidly. The overall reviews seem to generally say “strange, but interesting attraction”. 

Fun Fact about the Gum Wall:  It was named one of the top 5 “germiest” tourist attractions in 2009. Watch out germaphobes!

Fremont

Distance from hotel: 3.0 miles

Seattle's Fremont neighborhood, known locally as "The Center of the Universe", is notorious for its quirky atmosphere (although the recent arrival of some larger businesses, has started to undercut its bohemian image). If independent restaurants and shops, public art and dive bars are you’re thing, this is the place to be.

Fun Fact about Fremont:  Under the Aurora Bridge is a massive concrete statue of a one-eyed troll eating a Volkswagen Bug. So quirky.

Tags:  52nd Annual Meeting  Seattle 

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Continuing Education of the Bar (CEB) names former Thomson Reuters VP Kelly Lake as Executive Director

Posted By Administration, Thursday, May 5, 2016
Updated: Thursday, May 5, 2016

Kelly Lake
Kelly Lake, Executive Director of CEB

 

Continuing Education of the Bar (CEB) is pleased to announce that Kelly Lake has been named its Executive Director. A strategic business leader with extensive experience in the publishing and information sector, Ms. Lake brings expertise in building best-in-class rich-content and technology-based information and learning platforms.

 

Prior to joining CEB, Ms. Lake held key positions with Thomson Reuters in the UK and Asia, working to deliver a variety of legal workflow solutions and practice tools. Ms. Lake also has a decade of experience building local instances of the flagship Westlaw brand in the UK, China, and India.

 

Dean Wayne Smutz of UCLA Extension commented on the appointment: "We are thrilled that Kelly Lake has joined CEB. Kelly is an A-player: she is extremely savvy in the fields of business and information technology; sees challenge as opportunity; and has crafted, collaborated on, and delivered success after success. We welcome her expertise and look forward to her leadership."

 

Ms. Lake joined CEB as Interim IT Director in 2015, and has been working with its senior team to develop and execute the transformation of one of California's longest-standing legal publishers and providers of continuing legal education into a digital-platform organization. "I am thrilled to be at the helm of such an esteemed organization, with its amazing commitment to serving the California legal community. We are at a time when the legal profession and lawyers are navigating a multitude of changes, and I see this is as a unique opportunity for CEB to deliver content and tools that match the needs of an emerging generation of lawyers," said Lake.

 

CEB, the leading source for legal education and legal research solutions for California lawyers, is a self-supporting program of the University of California that is cosponsored by the State Bar of California. Founded in 194 7 with the mandate to cultivate the professional development of California lawyers, CEB was the first organization to offer formal continuing legal education in the state.

Tags:  CEB  Continuing Education of the Bar  Executive Director 

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